Support Julie Webster’s Wing Walk

At 12 noon on 29th August  2019 Julie from Medway Community Health is taking the opportunity to fly through the sky and raise awareness of the DWELL project and raise some money at the same time! 

Half of the money raised will be donated to ourZone and half will be used to raise awareness of diabetes. Email Julie at julie.webster1@nhs.net for a sponsorship form.

Did you know taking pain medications could lead to higher cardiovascular risks?

Researchers from University of British Columbia, Canada, have discovered that pain medications are linked to higher cardiovascular risks in patients with osteoarthritis.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can help to control the pain and inflammation in individuals with osteoarthritis (OA), but a new arthritis & rheumatology study suggests that NSAIDs contribute to cardiovascular side effects in these patients, therefore suggesting a higher chance of cardiovascular risks occurring.

To read more about this go to: https://www.healtheuropa.eu/did-you-know-taking-pain-medications-could-lead-to-higher-cardiovascular-risks/92773/

Empower parents, enable breastfeeding

Becoming the parent of a new baby is both a life-altering gift and an immense responsibility. This week, as countries around the world celebrate World Breastfeeding Week, UNICEF and WHO are calling on governments and all employers to adopt family-friendly policies that support breastfeeding. The theme of this year’s World Breastfeeding Week is “Empower Parents, Enable Breastfeeding.” 

These policies include paid maternity leave for a minimum of 18 weeks, and paid paternity leave, plus access to a parent-friendly workplace to protect and support mothers’ ability to continue breastfeeding upon return to work by having access to breastfeeding breaks; a safe, private, and hygienic space for expressing and storing breastmilk; and affordable childcare.

To read more about this go to: https://www.who.int/news-room/events/detail/2019/08/01/default-calendar/world-breastfeeding-week-2019

Ebola: 1 year into the DRC outbreak

1 August is the 1-year mark since the Ebola outbreak was declared in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). In the last year, there have been more than 2,600 confirmed cases, including more than 1,800 deaths in parts of Ituri and North Kivu provinces. Almost one in three cases is a child.

“At this critical juncture, we reaffirm our collective commitment to the people of the DRC; we mourn for those we have lost; and we call for solidarity to end this outbreak,” said heads of United Nations agencies in a joint statement on the Ebola outbreak. 

To read the full text go to: https://www.who.int/news-room/detail/31-07-2019-at-1-year-mark-we-mourn-the-lives-lost-and-call-for-solidarity

Statement by Commissioner Andriukaitis on the World Hepatitis Day

July 28th 2019 marked World Hepatitis Day.

Each year on this day, we have an opportunity to reflect how far we have come on the path to eliminating hepatitis globally, but also, to think how much more needs to be done to achieve this goal by 2030. ‘Invest in eliminating hepatitis’, this year’s theme could not be more timely in encouraging us all to set a clear direction for investment to ensure long-term, patient-focused results can be reached.

It saddens me to see the large number of people still living in the EU/EEA with Hepatitis B – which is preventable, and Hepatitis C – which is both preventable and curable. The figures are overwhelming – an estimated 4.7 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis B, 3.9 million with hepatitis C, and we lose more lives to Hepatitis B and C than HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis combined. How in 2019 can this be? How can it be that unimaginable suffering and stigma is endured by so many in Europe, and precious lives lost?

To read this statement in full go to: http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_STATEMENT-19-4771_en.htm

2019 EU Health Award: the Commission unveils shortlisted initiatives

The European Commission selected the shortlisted initiatives of the 2019 EU Health Award for cities, NGOs and schools seeking to prevent and reduce obesity in children and young people (6-18 years old).
The nine shortlisted per category, in alphabetical order by organisation, are:

CITY category

  • Amsterdam Health Weight Programme (AHWP) by Amsterdam (The Netherlands)
  • Weighty Friends (Ik heb een maatje) by Genk (Belgium)
  • Sintra Grows Healthy (Sintra Cresce Saudável) by Sintra (Portugal)

NGO category

  • FitforKids by FitforKids (Denmark)
  • CROKY MOVE Programme by RéPPOP BFC (France)
  • Healthy And Tasty (Zdravo I Fino) by Society “Our Children” Zabok (Croatia)

SCHOOL category

  • Active School Break by Antsla Gümnaasium (Estonia)
  • #Be Active @IES Guadalquivir by IES Guadalquivir (Spain)
  • Schools scheme for fruit and vegetables, milk and diary products by Primary School Podturen (Croatia)

The winners will be announced on 17 October 2019 at the Award Ceremony during the annual meeting of the EU Health Policy Platform in Brussels. The event will be live-streamed, with the link shared on the EU Health Award website and the EU Health Policy Platform.

Beware of the sun! Dermatologists share sunscreen tips as Europe copes with heatwave

As Europeans cope with a record heatwave suffocating much of the continent, the importance of sun protection cannot be overstated.

Why should we be careful? How to choose and apply sunscreen properly? Euronews gathered a few tips from dermatologists.

There is no such a thing as a healthy tan, dermatologists say.

“A tan is actually a sign that our skin has been harmed by UV radiation and is trying to defend itself against further damage. This kind of damage can, in turn, increase your risk of developing skin cancer,” the British Association of Dermatologists (BAD) warns.

There were over 140,000 new cases of melanoma of the skin across Europe In 2018, according to the Global Cancer Observatory, a majority of which is due to extensive sun exposure.

“In more than four out of five cases skin cancer is a preventable disease,” BAD said.

To read more about this, go to: https://www.euronews.com/2019/06/30/beware-of-the-sun-dermatologists-share-sunscreen-tips-as-europe-copes-with-heatwave

New film helps nurses to find healthier ways to cope

The NHS should heed the clear message from a powerful new film: look after the nurses you’ve got. By nurses for nurses, the timely film No Yeah Buts explores their stress, anxiety and fatigue and ways in which unhealthy coping mechanisms can be replaced by healthy ones. The aim is to deliver a clear message to NHS employers and to encourage more nurses to sign up for the NURSING YOU programme, which includes a weight management app and resources for nurses to make changes at their workplace.

At the launch of the film in London on 17 June, Professor Anne Marie Rafferty CBE, President of the Royal College of Nursing said ‘This really speaks to the dilemmas that nurses are wrestling with on a day-to-day basis. It’s an intelligent approach to try to design out some of the unhealthy habits and replace them with ones that are healthier, giving nurses back some form of control and the sense that we can change and be in charge of our destiny. And when we do it collectively we’ll all benefit, and less fatigued nurses will impact on patient safety’

To watch the film go to: https://www.c3health.org/blog/new-film-helps-nurses-to-find-healthier-ways-to-cope/

Europe’s Environmental Pollution & Children’s Brain Development

During pregnancy and infancy, environmental chemicals have a stronger influence on the human body than at any other time. What does that mean for brain development? What is the link to environmental, social, and economic inequality? 

Toxic environmental chemicals have been in the European public eye for decades. Think of Chernobyl, the clean-up of asbestos, or before that, the industrial revolution: biology textbooks still use the example of peppered moths in England which changed colour from light to dark during the 19th century, as pollution from burning coal in cities darkened their environment.

Researchers have uncovered important links between our health and what we are exposed to in our environments, such as air pollution, heavy metals, pesticides, and hazardous waste. A critical factor is at what age these exposures take place. Pregnancy and the first years of life are the most sensitive for exposure to toxic chemicals.

To read this article in full, go to: http://eurohealthnet-magazine.eu/europes-environmental-pollution-childrens-brain-development/