State-of-the-art study focusing on the health inequalities faced by LGBTI people

The review study focused on the health inequalities faced by LGBTI people (especially those in vulnerable situations) and the potential barriers faced by health professionals when providing their care. It brings together scientific research and grey literature in a way that leads to new insights and recommendations supported by evidence.

Health inequalities relating to LGBTI people occur due to the consequences of a complex interaction of environmental, social, cultural and political factors. Root causes likely to contribute to the experience of health inequalities by LGBTI people include: cultural and social norms that preference and prioritise heterosexuality; minority stress associated with sexual orientation, gender identity and sex characteristics; victimisation; discrimination (individual and institutional), and; stigma.

To read the full report by the European Commission: https://ec.europa.eu/health/sites/health/files/social_determinants/docs/stateofart_report_en.pdf

EHMA 2018 Annual Conference

The EHMA 2018 Annual Conference will take place in Budapest, Hungary, at Semmelweis University from 20 – 22 June 2018. The theme, “Making it happen” aims to raise discussions about delivering change and overcoming challenges in policy implementation.

As EHMA Member, (through the Health and Europe Centre – contact us if you are interested in attending) you will have access to extra treatment upon arrival and a complimentary Gala dinner pass, a 100 EUR extra discount on the fees, the opportunity of becoming an EHMA Ambassador and attending the conference for free, and 10% for the group of more than 5 attendees from the same organisation.

Pin it in your agenda and do not miss the Super Early Bird fee available on the Conference website as from Tuesday 26th. You can discover more about the EHMA 2018 Annual Conference and follow the news on the upcoming Call for Abstracts on www.ehma2018.org.

Food and drink policies for better heart health

A message for World Heart Day, by Vytenis Andriukaitis, European Commissioner for Health and Food Safety:

“I am a big fan of a Mediterranean style diet, rich in fruit and vegetables that is good for heart health. Unfortunately the numbers seem to suggest that not so many of us adopt this kind of regime. Indeed, only one in seven people over the age of 15 in the EU eats the recommended five portions of fruit and vegetables every day according to 2016 figures. Furthermore, in 17 EU countries more that 50% of adults are overweight or obese, which we know is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease s (CVDs).”

The latter remains the leading cause of death and a major cause of illness and disability in the EU, despite considerable progress in tackling CVDs. According to the latest Eurostat data, heart diseases and strokes causes over 1.8 million deaths in the EU in 2014 alone, and according to the European Heart Network, dietary risks are the cause of around half of premature deaths from CVD. As our diet is such an important factor in warding off CVD, on this year’s World Heart Day I would like to focus on the importance of food and drink policies for heart health, and outline some supportive EU-actions in this area of national competence.

To read this message in full on the European Commission website: http://ec.europa.eu/newsroom/sante/newsletter-specific-archive-issue.cfm?newsletter_service_id=327&newsletter_issue_id=5329

Antibacterial agents in clinical development

As part of implementation of the Global Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance, WHO drew up a list of priority antibiotic-resistant pathogens (priority pathogens list; PPL) to guide research into and the discovery and development of new antibiotics. As a further step, WHO reviewed the publicly available information on the current clinical development pipeline of antibacterial agents to assess the extent to which the drug candidates act against these priority pathogens, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Clostridium difficile.

The review shows that the current clinical pipeline is still insufficient to mitigate the threat of antimicrobial resistance.

To read this report in full: http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/258965/1/WHO-EMP-IAU-2017.11-eng.pdf?ua=1

 

 

Measles are no longer an endemic in 79% of the WHO European Region

In the WHO European Region, 42 of 53 countries have interrupted endemic transmission of measles, and 37 Member States have interrupted endemic transmission of rubella as of the end of 2016. This was determined by the European Regional Verification Commission for Measles and Rubella Elimination (RVC) at its 6th meeting in June 2017.

“I congratulate each country for fulfilling the commitment to protect its people from measles and rubella and collectively moving the European Region closer to its elimination goal,” said Dr Zsuzsanna Jakab, WHO Regional Director for Europe. “However, we cannot become complacent now. Outbreaks continue to cause unnecessary suffering and loss of life.”

To read more about this on the WHO/Europe website: http://www.euro.who.int/en/media-centre/sections/press-releases/2017/measles-no-longer-endemic-in-79-of-the-who-european-region

EU and FAO join forces to take action on food waste and antimicrobial resistance

The EU and the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations join forces to take action on food waste and antimicrobial resistance.

The Commissioner for Health and Food Safety Vytenis Andriukaitis and the Director-General of the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) José Graziano da Silva, today agreed to ramp up collaboration between the two organisations in tackling the problems of waste in food supply chains and antimicrobial resistance.

The FAO and the EU pledge to work closely together to halve per capita food waste by 2030, a goal established under the new Sustainable Development Goals global agenda. It also commits them to intensified cooperation on tackling the spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) on farms and in food systems.

To read more about these initiatives on the European Commission website: http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-17-3561_en.htm

European Commission adopts acts on good manufacturing practices for medicines

The European Commission adopted two legal acts aimed at improving patient safety in the EU through good manufacturing practices (GMP) that ensure the highest quality of medicines for human use.

The first act is an implementing directive that sets out principles and guidelines of GMP in medicines where the manufacture or import is subject to a manufacturing authorisation: see Article 40 of the Community code Directive (2001/83/EC).

The second act is a delegated regulation that sets out GMP for investigational medicinal products, as required by the Clinical Trials Regulation (536/2014/EU), and detailed arrangements for inspections. This legal act ensures the highest quality of medicinal products used in clinical trials and prepares the smooth entry into force of this Regulation.

To read more about this on the europa.eu website: http://ec.europa.eu/newsroom/sante/newsletter-specific-archive-issue.cfm?newsletter_service_id=327&newsletter_issue_id=5153

Germany promotes G20 initiative against antimicrobial resistance

The German government’s Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) is dedicating up to EUR 500 million in the coming decade to support the G20’s international research initiative devoted to fighting antimicrobial resistance (AMR). The initiative was announced in the G20 leaders’ final declaration at the end of the G20 summit in July. The BMBF’s funding pledge came shortly afterwards.

Germany has played a decisive role in getting the AMR initiative up and running during its G20 presidency. Ahead of the summit in Hamburg, the country organised and held the first-ever meeting solely for G20 health ministers.

To read more about this initiative on the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy website: http://www.exportinitiative-gesundheitswirtschaft.de/EIG/Redaktion/EN/Kurzmeldungen/News/2017/2017-08-15-germany-promotes-g20-initiative-against-antimicrobial-resistance.html

 

European Commission Initiative on Breast Cancer

European women’s probability of developing breast cancer over a lifetime is approximately 1 in 8*. A woman’s individual risk of breast cancer may be higher or lower than this average, depending on a number of factors, including age, family history, reproductive history (such as menstrual and childbearing history), race/ethnicity, and others.

The ECIBC is developing recommendations for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. Each recommendation is specifically tailored to the needs of citizens and patients, health professionals, and policy makers. All recommendations are based on the female population at ‘average’ and ‘below average’ risk of developing breast cancer.

To read more about this initiative on the Europa.eu site: http://ecibc.jrc.ec.europa.eu/recommendations/

Improving health of refugees and migrants

Since 2015, hundreds of thousands of migrants and refugees have entered Europe, either escaping conflict in their country or in search of better economic prospects.Most migrants are healthy when they arrive in the EU, but they can be affected by conditions and factors prior to their travel or during their journey. They may be suffering from physical exhaustion, extreme distress, dehydration or cold. These challenges, combined with other issues, such as inadequate living conditions or unhealthy lifestyles, can seriously impact their physical and mental health. If they were already dealing with chronic diseases, their health may have further deteriorated.

No person entering the EU should be left without access to basic healthcare, and no EU country can or should be left alone to manage the public health dimension of such an unprecedented crisis.

To read more about improving health of refugees and migrants at europa.eu: http://ec.europa.eu/chafea/news/news523.html