Parent and child exercise: the importance of exercising as a new parent

The pressure of becoming a parent can be quite daunting and having a brand-new little bundle of joy can take a toll on physical heath, making parent and child exercise vital.

Having a child can very quickly take up almost all of your time, energy and love. It’s completely understandable that exercising, amongst other things, will always take a backseat as you begin to experience the life of parenthood, but you may be surprised to hear there are a fantastic range of benefits to gentle exercise as a new parent. Children’s retailer, Kiddies Kingdom outline the many positive outcomes of parent and child exercise.

Research suggests that some of the lowest rates of physical activity demographically can be found in women with young children, and whilst it’s entirely understandable that the exhaustion of everyday life can take over as a new parent, it’s key to avoid these habits continuing past the point of recovery to ensure a healthy lifestyle.

To read more about this, go to: https://www.healtheuropa.eu/parent-and-child-exercise/92058/

It’s critical to encourage blood donation among minorities, according to research

According to research, medical mistrust is a significant barrier to blood donation among minorities therefore better community education and communication is critical.

Researchers at Georgia State University and Georgia Southern University, USA, conducted the first systematic literature review of research on barriers and facilitators regarding blood donations among minorities. Nursing associate Professor Regena Spratling in the Byrdine F. Lewis College of Nursing and Health Professions at Georgia State and her colleagues in the Georgia Southern University School of Public Health conducted the research.

To read more go to: www.healtheuropa.eu/blood-donation-among-minorities/92016/

Hundreds of brands across EU ‘breaking’ bloc’s chemical safety rule

Companies producing food, medicine, cosmetics and plastic across Europe are breaking EU legislation not completing important safety checks when using millions of tonnes of chemicals in production, an analysis has found.

This has been going on for years but was only recently discovered thanks to German government files, which environmental group BUND obtained.

The companies failed to report whether these chemicals are harmful to unborn babies or cancerous, or pose a threat to the environment.

As many as 12 to 121 million tonnes of the 41 different chemicals concerned are used in Europe every year. They can be found in customer and industrial products, including medicines, food contacts (such as packaging) and toys.

To read more about this go to: https://www.euronews.com/2019/05/22/hundreds-of-brands-across-eu-breaking-bloc-s-chemical-safety-rules

One million new sexually transmitted diseases recorded every day, warns World Health Organization

A “wake up call” among people aged 15-49 years old is urgently needed with a million new sexually transmitted infections (STIs) occur every day across the world, says the World Health Organization (WHO).

According to a new report released by the health agency, 127 million new cases of chlamydia were recorded and 87 million cases of gonorrhoea in 2016.

Syphilis (6.3 million) and trichomoniasis (156 million) are also considered part of the four curable STIs the health agency says remain a “persistent and endemic health threat worldwide”.

“We’re seeing a concerning lack of progress in stopping the spread of sexually transmitted infections worldwide,” said Dr Peter Salama, Executive Director for Universal Health Coverage and the Life-Course at WHO.

To read more about this go to: https://www.euronews.com/2019/06/07/one-million-new-stis-recorded-every-day-warns-world-health-organization

23 million people falling ill from unsafe food each year in Europe is just the tip of the iceberg

Every minute, 44 people – more than 23 million per year – fall sick from eating contaminated food, and an estimated 4700 per year lose their lives. This is according to a review of the most recent available data entitled “The burden of foodborne diseases in the WHO European Region”, and it represents only the tip of the iceberg: the true number of cases is unknown.

These findings were presented on the occasion of the first-ever World Food Safety Day on 7 June 2019. The WHO European Region joined partners across the world in celebrating the day to raise awareness and promote action to improve food safety.

To read more about this go to: http://www.euro.who.int/en/media-centre/sections/press-releases/2019/23-million-people-falling-ill-from-unsafe-food-each-year-in-europe-is-just-the-tip-of-the-iceberg

RegioStars Award: CASCADE

Our Interreg 2Seas CASCADE project is up for an EU RegioStars Award under the category “Modernising health systems”.

To avoid overwhelming health systems and to encourage a more inclusive society, new financially sustainable and widely applicable approaches are needed for dementia care. The CASCADE model promotes a strengths-based approach to holistic person-centred dementia care to maximise independence and quality of life for people living with dementia in the local community. 

Please go to https://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/en/regio-stars-awards/2019/categ5 to “like” CASCADE and get it through to the finals.

World No Tobacco Day: The price of tobacco is linked to proportion of smokers

The cheaper the price of tobacco, the higher the percentage of people that smoke finds the latest Eurostat data.

The report looked at the price of a 20 pack of Marlboro cigarettes in every European country and cross-referenced these figures with the percentage of people who smoke in that country.

Turkey and Bulgaria, where tobacco is cheapest (under €3 per pack) to buy, are home to the highest proportion of smokers in Europe, with nearly 28% of the population smoking daily.

To read more about this, go to: https://www.euronews.com/2019/05/31/world-no-tobacco-day-the-price-of-tobacco-is-linked-to-proportion-of-smokers

Alice Chapman-Hatchett: The future of health research in Europe—three visions for 2029

In May the European Health Forum Gastein (EHFG) travelled to London to discuss what the world of health research will look like 10 years from now. The event showcased a recently published report Research Futures, which looked at how research will be created and exchanged in a decade’s time, and started setting the scene for the main theme of this year’s Gastein Forum: disruptive change.

The report details three potential scenarios for health research in 2029. We have a brave open world, where state funders and philanthropic organisations have joined forces to collaborate and publish research via open access platforms, harnessing advances in artificial intelligence (AI) and technology to produce a joined-up approach. Next is tech titans, where industry and philanthropic foundations are the principal research funders, machine learning and AI advances are leading to a substantial proportion of research being carried out by machines, and few global shared solutions are emerging. The third scenario, eastern ascendance, envisions a future in which the volume of China’s public investment in research and development has made the East a magnet for international researchers. In this world, nations are working in isolation and international alignment on tackling global societal problems is proving difficult.

To read this article in full, go to: https://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2019/05/10/alice-chapman-hatchett-future-health-research-europe-three-visions-2029/

Let’s talk about World Menstrual Hygiene Day

The 29th of May was World Menstrual Hygiene Day 2019, so Health Europa wanted to take the opportunity to highlight the growing contribution to research and global action on menstrual health, saying:

“It’s about time we mitigate gender-health related disparities across the world – and research by the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM), led by Dr Penelope Phillips-Howard, is helping to address this. Issues relating to menstrual hygiene and health, and issues such as the lack of sanitary products in low and middle-income countries are all aspects that LSTM are addressing. Following successful interventions in Kenya, which have seen students staying in school, the expertise developed will now be used to research period poverty faced by homeless girls and women living in Liverpool.”

To read more about this go to: https://www.healtheuropa.eu/menstrual-hygiene/91807/

WHA 72: achievements, commitment, accountability

The 72nd annual World Health Assembly ended on the 28th of May in Geneva. Over 9 days, Member States adopted a new global strategy on health, environment and climate change and committed to invest in safe water, sanitation and hygiene services in health facilities. Countries adopted a landmark agreement to enhance the transparency of pricing for medicines, vaccines and other health products. The new WHO programme budget was approved and a common approach to antimicrobial resistance was agreed.

Patient safety was recognized as a global health priority and the 11th Edition of the International Classification of Diseases was adopted. Countries agreed three resolutions on universal health coverage with a focus on primary healthcare, the role of community health workers and the High-Level Meeting on Universal Health Coverage in New York in September 2019.

To read more about this, go to: https://mailchi.mp/who.int/wha-72-achievements-commitment-accountability?e=e15a27e9c7