Dutch hospitals warn on medical supplies if there’s a no-deal Brexit

EU certification granted in the U.K. to medical supplies made in other countries could become invalid in the event of a no-deal Brexit, Dutch hospitals group warns.

A no-deal Brexit carries “great risks” to medical supplies in the Netherlands and across the EU, the Dutch Federation of Academic Hospitals (NFU) warned Wednesday.

An “emergency law” has been requested to license the use of U.K.-certified medical supplies until the end of 2019, Reuters reports, amid growing concern that hospitals across the EU could be left without sufficient medical supplies if Britain crashes out of the bloc on March 29 with no deal.

To read more about this, go to: https://www.politico.eu/article/dutch-hospitals-warn-on-medical-supplies-if-theres-a-no-deal-brexit/

No-deal Brexit: Plan to maintain medicine supplies ‘could cost £2bn’

The health secretary’s plan to set aside six weeks’ worth of vital medicines to avoid supply disruptions in the event of a no-deal Brexit could cost up to £2bn, campaign group Best for Britain warns.

Matt Hancock wrote to healthcare providers last week, saying the government would set in motion plans to “ensure the UK has an additional six weeks’ supply of medicines in case imports from the EU through certain routes are affected”.

Data collated by thinktank the King’s Fund earlier this year suggested the total drugs bill for the NHS in 2016-17 was £17.4bn. Best for Britain suggests that could make the cost of the temporary stockpile – which would presumably then be run down over future months – £2bn.

To read more about this go to: https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/aug/29/no-deal-brexit-plan-medicine-supplies-cost-2bn

Post-Brexit EHIC cards: Will they be invalid post-2019?

With Brexit negotiations continuing. Hundreds of questions are being raised.

Travel industry experts have raised concerns regarding a number of issues such as visa controls and open sky agreements. Ryanair’s Michael O’Leary has been vocal in his concerns that planes could even be grounded if an agreement is not made. However another aspect to cause concern is the continuation of the EHIC card, which provides free emergency care to people in the EU and affects 27 million Britons.

Could Britons be left stranded abroad without urgent health care?

The Lords EU committee report in March stated: “In the absence of an agreement on future relations that covers this topic, the rights to reciprocal healthcare currently enjoyed by 27 million UK citizens, thanks to the EHIC, will cease after Brexit.”

Yet there is another way in which the UK could be included, by looking at countries outside of the EU which are still allowed to reap the benefits.

Source: Post-Brexit EHIC cards: Will they be invalid post-2019? | Travel News | Travel | Express.co.uk

Brexit and the social care workforce

Over the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the proportion of European migrants in the social care workforce. In the first part of 2016 alone, over 80% of all migrant care workers who moved to England to take on a social care role were from Europe. Any restrictions to the migration of European citizens would likely reduce the overall number of workers in the social care sector, making it even harder to recruit and retain the necessary numbers of staff.

The charity Independent Age has produced a report ‘Brexit and the future of migrants in the social care workforce’ that reviews future workforce shortages in adult social care in England taking into account the EU referendum result.

To download the report on Brexit and workforce shortages from the independentage.org website.