Treating ovarian cancer may be achieved with a new class of drugs

According to Manchester University, UK, a new class of drugs, called PARG inhibitors, have the ability of treating ovarian cancer and even stopping cancer cells from growing.

Published in the Journal Cancer Cell, a study funded by the Cancer Research UK and Wellcome Trust showed that treating ovarian cancer may come sooner than you think. According to the researchers at The University of Manchester the drugs, PARG inhibitors, can kill ovarian cancer cells by targeting weaknesses within their ability to copy their DNA.

The first-in-class PARG inhibitor PDD00017273, was discovered in the Drug Discovery Unit at the Cancer Research UK Manchester Institute, part of The University of Manchester, as part of a targeted program to discover PARG inhibitors for the clinic.

To read more about this on the Health Europa website, go to: https://www.healtheuropa.eu/treating-ovarian-cancer/90840/

This program is currently being progressed through a collaboration with IDEAYA Biosciences, Inc., an oncology-focused biotechnology company dedicated to the discovery of breakthrough synthetic lethality medicines and immuno-oncology therapies.

Cancer screening device: detecting cancer from breath

Detecting cancer from breath doesn’t sound possible right? Well, SniffPhone is the new cancer screening device that enables early diagnosis of gastric cancer by simply exhaling into your phone.

Currently in its prototype phase, SniffPhone enables early diagnosis of gastric cancer from detecting cancer from breath. This new cancer screening device has the ability to revolutionise cancer screening all over the world.

SniffPhone is a small sensor developed as a cancer screening device that can be attached to a smartphone.

In practice, the user holds the device in front of his or her mouth and exhales onto the sensor to give a breath sample. This test for cancer measures the contained Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) using highly sensitive nanotechnology-based chemical sensors.

The measurements are then sent via Bluetooth using a smartphone to a dedicated cloud platform, where they are analysed by the appropriate medical personnel.

The SniffPhone project is financed under the EU’s Horizon 2020 Programme for research, technological development and demonstration. The SniffPhone was developed by a consortium of nine partners from six countries. The nanosensors of the SniffPhone were developed in Israel, the micropump by Cellix in Ireland, fluidics by Microfluidic ChipShop in Germany, and the cloud platform by VTT in Finland.

To read more about this go to: https://www.healtheuropa.eu/cancer-screening-device-detecting-cancer-from-breath/90718/

European Cancer Information System

ECIS provides the latest information on indicators that quantify the cancer burden across Europe. It permits the exploration of geographical patterns and temporal trends of incidence, mortality and survival data across Europe for the major cancer entities.

The purpose of the web-application is to support research as well as public-health decision-making in the field of cancer and to serve as a point of reference and information for European citizens.

For more information, go to ECIS

Improving the efficiency of chemotherapy with a new molecule

Researchers from the CNRS and Université Nice Sophia Antipolis, France, have demonstrated that methiothepin, a small molecule, can improve the efficiency of chemotherapy by inhibiting the resistance of certain tumours.

Cancerous tumours are also capable of ‘detoxing’, subsequently limiting the efficiency of chemotherapy, and in order to better understand this phenomenon, the research team studied the patched membrane protein, showing that this protein is capable of expelling some of the primary active ingredients of chemotherapy from cancerous cells. The rejection of these toxic substances enables the tumour to eventually survive the treatment.

To read more about this on the Health Europa website go to: Improving the efficiency of chemotherapy with a new molecule

Protecting workers against cancer-causing chemicals

The European Commission is proposing to limit workers’ exposure to five cancer-causing chemicals, in addition to the 21 substances that have already been limited or proposed to be limited. Estimates show that this proposal would improve working conditions for over 1,000,000 EU workers and prevent over 22,000 cases of work-related illness.

The following five carcinogens of high relevance for the protection of workers have been selected:

  • Cadmium and its inorganic compounds;
  • Beryllium and inorganic beryllium compounds;
  • Arsenic acid and its salts, as well as inorganic arsenic compounds;
  • Formaldehyde;
  • 4,4′-Methylene-bis(2-chloroaniline) (MOCA).

To read more about protecting workers against cancer-causing chemicals, go to: http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-18-2662_en.htm

European Cancer Information System

The European Cancer Information System provides the latest information on indicators that quantify cancer-burden across Europe. It permits the exploration of geographical patterns and temporal trends of incidence, mortality and survival data across Europe for the major cancer entities.

The purpose of the web-application is to support research as well as public-health decision-making in the field of cancer and to serve as a point of reference and information for European citizens.

To read more about the European Cancer Information System go to: ECIS – Home – European Commission

Improving quality of life and survival for young cancer patients

Cancer in children is rare and, unlike cancer in adults, is not linked to lifestyle factors. Over the past decades, survival rates for children with cancer have improved tremendously due to advances in treatment.

However, survival rates remain low in some places where the best treatments are not always available. The inequalities are dramatic – in western Europe more than 90% of children with cancer are cured, while the figure can be less than 20% in lower-income countries of the WHO European Region

To read more about improving quality of life and survival for young cancer patients go to: WHO/Europe | Improving quality of life and survival for young cancer patients

A message from Commissioner Andriukaitis for International Women’s Day 2018

International Women’s Day – an occasion that celebrates women’s achievements, from political to social, whilst continuing to call for gender equality and women’s rights – I would like to remind people of one key prerequisite for meeting our aspirations: health. The World Health Organisation defines health as a “state of complete physical, mental and social wellbeing and not merely the absence of disease infirmity”. Health is for all, without discrimination. It is the obligation of each State to support the right to health, and to allocate adequate resources to health promotion and prevention, including the provision of regular screening for cancers for women.

To read the message in full go to: http://ec.europa.eu/newsroom/sante/newsletter-specific-archive-issue.cfm?newsletter_service_id=327&newsletter_issue_id=7659

European Commission Initiative on Breast Cancer

European women’s probability of developing breast cancer over a lifetime is approximately 1 in 8*. A woman’s individual risk of breast cancer may be higher or lower than this average, depending on a number of factors, including age, family history, reproductive history (such as menstrual and childbearing history), race/ethnicity, and others.

The ECIBC is developing recommendations for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. Each recommendation is specifically tailored to the needs of citizens and patients, health professionals, and policy makers. All recommendations are based on the female population at ‘average’ and ‘below average’ risk of developing breast cancer.

To read more about this initiative on the Europa.eu site: http://ecibc.jrc.ec.europa.eu/recommendations/

Public health interventions to manage sunbeds

 

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer among light-skinned populations. The chief environmental cause of skin cancer is ultraviolet radiation (UVR). UVR exposure comes mainly from the sun, but over the past three decades there has been an increase in the use of artificial sources of UVR in the form of artificial tanning devices, such as sunbeds, stand up booths and facial tanners. This deliberate exposure to UVR is increasing the incidence of the major types of skin cancer.

The World Health Organization has produced a document intended for government health authorities, to assist in the development of public health interventions in relation to the use and management of sunbeds. The document provides a summary of health effects as well as a catalogue of interventions that have been used to reduce risks associated with artificial tanning. It is supplemented by a WHO database on sunbed regulations.

Artificial tanning is a recent phenomenon. Sunbeds and other tanning devices emitting artificial ultraviolet radiation (UVR) were developed in the 1960s but it was not until the 1980s that people began to use tanning beds in large numbers. During the 1990s, the artificial tanning industry grewrapidly in Northern Europe, Australia and the Americas. With increasing exposure by young people,often women, to artificial ultraviolet radiation, the health risks soon became apparent. Artificialtanning is now seen as a public health issue accounting for about half a million new cancer diagnoseseach year in the United States of America, Europe and Australia. Evidence of an association between artificial tanning and risk of skin cancer clearly shows that the risk is highest in those exposed to artificial tanning in early life.

More information on public health interventions to manage artificial tanning devices on the who.int website.