PATH’s launch in Southampton with a Teddy Bears Picnic

Our EU-funded Interreg 2Seas PATH project, focusing on perinatal mental health, was launched on the 27th of August in Southampton. The project’s mascot in Southampton, Peri the PATH bear, was on hand to welcome families in the area to a Teddy Bears Picnic in order to raise awareness of and destigmatise perinatal mental health issues. The day was thoroughly enjoyed by all those who attended and was a great way to kick off the project that will run until September 2022.

For more information about the project, follow us on Twitter @2SeasPATH

Empower parents, enable breastfeeding

Becoming the parent of a new baby is both a life-altering gift and an immense responsibility. This week, as countries around the world celebrate World Breastfeeding Week, UNICEF and WHO are calling on governments and all employers to adopt family-friendly policies that support breastfeeding. The theme of this year’s World Breastfeeding Week is “Empower Parents, Enable Breastfeeding.” 

These policies include paid maternity leave for a minimum of 18 weeks, and paid paternity leave, plus access to a parent-friendly workplace to protect and support mothers’ ability to continue breastfeeding upon return to work by having access to breastfeeding breaks; a safe, private, and hygienic space for expressing and storing breastmilk; and affordable childcare.

To read more about this go to: https://www.who.int/news-room/events/detail/2019/08/01/default-calendar/world-breastfeeding-week-2019

Europe’s Environmental Pollution & Children’s Brain Development

During pregnancy and infancy, environmental chemicals have a stronger influence on the human body than at any other time. What does that mean for brain development? What is the link to environmental, social, and economic inequality? 

Toxic environmental chemicals have been in the European public eye for decades. Think of Chernobyl, the clean-up of asbestos, or before that, the industrial revolution: biology textbooks still use the example of peppered moths in England which changed colour from light to dark during the 19th century, as pollution from burning coal in cities darkened their environment.

Researchers have uncovered important links between our health and what we are exposed to in our environments, such as air pollution, heavy metals, pesticides, and hazardous waste. A critical factor is at what age these exposures take place. Pregnancy and the first years of life are the most sensitive for exposure to toxic chemicals.

To read this article in full, go to: http://eurohealthnet-magazine.eu/europes-environmental-pollution-childrens-brain-development/

A new PATH to perinatal mental health

Our recently funded Interreg 2Seas project PATH is aiming to enable women, families, healthcare professionals, and employers to prevent, diagnose and successfully manage mild and moderate perinatal mental health issues, leading to happier and healthier families. This year’s focus for the EuroHealthNet magazine is ‘Children and Young People’ and an article all about PATH has been published in the latest edition of the magazine, to read it in full go to: http://eurohealthnet-magazine.eu/a-new-path-to-perinatal-mental-health/

1,000 life-changing days

The first 1000 days of life are extraordinary. It is when the foundations of the rest of our lives are created. The brain develops more than at any other time. It is when our surroundings affect us the most.

Those days shape the adults we become, our future health and wellbeing, and our ability to raise happy and healthy future generations. In those first 1000 days and beyond, not all children have the same opportunities to grow and thrive. 

EuroHealthNet have produced a new video exploring the effects of social, emotional, and physical environments during the first three years of life on long-term health and wellbeing. It looks at the actions needed to create solid foundations for later life.

To watch the video, go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rj3FhN-mfFw&feature=youtu.be


Alcohol brands are marketing their booze as ‘wellness’ drinks in a desperate bid to recapture the market

Millennials are spending less money on alcohol than both baby boomers and Generation X, according to a Nerdwallet analysis of a 2017 Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Consumer Expenditure Survey. The analysis notes, however, that they’re spending roughly the same percentage of their income – 1% – on alcohol. When they do drink, millennials tend to opt for wine and spirits as their drink of choice, which has created a crisis in the beer industry, as Business Insider’s Kate Taylor previously reported

Some millennials are flirting with giving up alcohol altogether, or at least drinking it more mindfully. This ties into the generation’s enthusiasm for wellness and self-care, which has prompted a boom in businesses like luxury wellness centers that offer vitamin IV drips for glowing skin, cryotherapy for workout recovery, and infrared sauna sessions to de-stress. For millennials, wellness is the ultimate modern luxury.

To read more about this, go to: http://eucam.info/2019/06/04/millennials-are-spending-less-money-on-alcohol-than-previous-generations-now-brands-are-marketing-their-booze-as-wellness-drinks-in-a-desperate-bid-to-capture-the-market/

€250 to support healthy eating

Millions of children across the EU will receive milk, fruit and vegetables under the EU’s School Scheme in 2019/2020. This programme reached over 20 million children across the EU during the school year 2017/2018.

The national budget allocations for the EU school fruit, vegetable and milk schemes for the 2019/2020 school year was adopted today. €145 million are set aside for fruit and vegetables, and €105 million for milk and other dairy products. The distribution programme is complemented by educational measures that teach children about agriculture and promotes healthy eating.

To read more about this, go to: http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-19-1848_en.htm

Parent and child exercise: the importance of exercising as a new parent

The pressure of becoming a parent can be quite daunting and having a brand-new little bundle of joy can take a toll on physical heath, making parent and child exercise vital.

Having a child can very quickly take up almost all of your time, energy and love. It’s completely understandable that exercising, amongst other things, will always take a backseat as you begin to experience the life of parenthood, but you may be surprised to hear there are a fantastic range of benefits to gentle exercise as a new parent. Children’s retailer, Kiddies Kingdom outline the many positive outcomes of parent and child exercise.

Research suggests that some of the lowest rates of physical activity demographically can be found in women with young children, and whilst it’s entirely understandable that the exhaustion of everyday life can take over as a new parent, it’s key to avoid these habits continuing past the point of recovery to ensure a healthy lifestyle.

To read more about this, go to: https://www.healtheuropa.eu/parent-and-child-exercise/92058/

Why we need to talk about losing a baby

Losing a baby in pregnancy through miscarriage or stillbirth is still a taboo subject worldwide, linked to stigma and shame. Many women still do not receive appropriate and respectful care when their baby dies during pregnancy or childbirth. 

Miscarriage is the most common reason for losing a baby during pregnancy. Estimates vary, although March of Dimes, an organization that works on maternal and child health, indicates a miscarriage rate of 10-15% in women who knew they were pregnant. Pregnancy loss is defined differently around the world, but in general a baby who dies before 28 weeks of pregnancy is referred to as a miscarriage, and babies who die at or after 28 weeks are stillbirths. Every year, 2.6 million babies are stillborn, and many of these deaths are preventable. However, miscarriages and stillbirths are not systematically recorded, even in developed countries, suggesting that the numbers could be even higher.  

To read more about this go to: https://www.who.int/maternal-health/why-we-need-to-talk-about-losing-a-baby