Women’s health and well-being in Europe

The latest session of the WHO Regional Committee for Europe has considered the Strategy on women’s health and well-being in the WHO European Region and produced a report “Women’s health and well-being in Europe: beyond the mortality advantage”.

To provide background to the Strategy, the new report:

  • presents a snapshot of women’s health in the Region;
  • discusses the social, economic and environmental factors that determine women’s health and well-being;
  • focuses on the impact of gender-based discrimination and gender stereotypes;
  • considers how people-centred health systems could respond to women’s needs; and
  • outlines important perspectives for the international and national frameworks that govern women’s health and well-being in Europe.

Download the full report on Women’s health and wellbeing in Europe from the euro.who.int website

Mental Health systems in OECD countries

Mental ill-health is widespread and its impact on people’s achievement in life is substantial. The large costs mental ill-health generates for people, families, workplaces and society as a whole is a major and growing concern for OECD governments in recent years.

The OECD is responding to this rising interest with a range of projects looking at (i) mental health care policies and reforms, (ii) the link between mental ill-health and work, (iii) health care quality aspects, and (iv) the impact of education, skills and mental ill-health.

For more information about OECD mental health projects, on the oecd.org website

Global survey of assistive technology

The World Health Organization (WHO) has launched a global survey to gather views on the most necessary and useful assistive technologies such as hearing aids, wheel chairs and personal alarms.

The survey will feed into the first ever WHO mandated list of essential assistive technologies to provide a tool for governments. Governments can use the list to plan and focus efforts to help populations acquire the 50 priority products, thereby improving the everyday lives of the elderly and people with disabilities.

These practical tools – some low, some higher technologies – are becoming increasingly necessary to the many people in high- and middle-income countries who are living longer due to better healthcare. Similar devices are used by people with disabilities, allowing them to live more autonomously and participate in their communities.

However, such tools are not readily available everywhere. WHO estimates that only 1 out of 10 people who need these vital supports are accessing them today, due to lack of availability and awareness, and high costs. The aim is to increase access to assistive technologies for 1 billion people who need them today, and to reach 1.5 billion by 2030.

To read more about the survey and, if you wish, take part on the who.int website

Empowerment of Disabled People

October 2014. This conference was part of Phase 1 of the EDECT project. You can see the full programme and the presentations are listed below in order of appearance at the conference: