Perinatal mental health

Perinatal mental illnesses affect at least 10% of new mothers and can have a devastating impact on them and their families. When mothers suffer from illnesses such as anxiety, depression and postnatal psychotic disorders it increases the likelihood of their children experiencing behavioural, social or learning difficulties and failing to fulfil their potential.

This project (PATH) is applying for funding from the Interreg 2Seas programme and will devise and pilot a range of services within local areas to ensure that women who are at risk of, or suffering from, perinatal mental illnesses are given appropriate support at the earliest opportunity. These services will support new mothers in their return to work and will have a clear cost benefit to them, their families and to health systems. Perinatal mental illnesses in the UK are estimated to cost society around £8.1 billion for each one-year cohort of births, with 72% of this cost relating to adverse, long-term  impacts on the child.

We have only just started looking for partners but already have interested organisations in the UK including KMPT, Plymouth MIND and the Institute of Health Visitors as well as Odisee and Karel de Grote University in Belgium.

Sexual health in the over 50s

People in their 50s, 60s, 70s and 80s are having sex with new partners but many don’t think safer sex applies to them, perhaps because they are past child-bearing age and/or because they have recently come out of a long-term relationship and haven’t had to think about safe sex issues for many years.

As a result, sexually transmitted infections are increasing in this age group. However many older adults missed out on safe sex education and the result is they are diagnosed with an STI when it is too late to benefit from the medications available for treatment of diseases in their early stages.

This project (SHIFT) is looking for funding from the Interreg 2Seas programme to raise awareness and knowledge of both clinicians and the general public so that attitudes are changed, the older generation is engaged and empowered through the provision of better information, and delivery strategies are improved.

This will lead to reduced rates of STIs, and therefore lower health care costs and a better trained healthcare workforce able to offer fit-for-purpose services.

We are actively looking for partners but already have interest from Medway Council, Canterbury Christ Church University, KCC, KentCHT, Brighton and Hove and the Metro charity in the UK as well as Eurasante in France and Vives in Belgium.

EDECT

EDECT logo

2014 – 2015 EDECT: Empowerment of Disabled People through Ethics in Care and Technology

This Interreg IVA 2 Seas project was a direct result of the success of two earlier projects – Dignity in Care (DIC) in Belgium and SYSIASS.

The outcomes from these two projects identified the importance of combining ethical practice with technological developments in order to best serve the needs of disabled people, their families and their carers.

EDECT provided exactly that bridge and Phase1of the project consisted of a conference and a  publication

Phase 2 took the project further, with a series of four pilots testing both the wheelchair developed in the earlier SYSIASS project and the ethical training programme created during the Dignity in Care project.

These pilots took place in Canterbury Kent, Gits The Netherlands, Lille France, and Lomme Belgium and a final report was produced.

For more information about this exciting project, or to download all the tools created by the partners, go to www.edect.weebly.com

Empowerment of Disabled People

October 2014. This conference was part of Phase 1 of the EDECT project. You can see the full programme and the presentations are listed below in order of appearance at the conference: