Health inequalities for LGBTI people

The European Parliament funds a number of pilot projects – projects which are experimental and designed to test the feasibility and usefulness of action. They are intended to develop evidence-based strategies to address a problem, identify good practices, and provide policy guidance for the benefit of possible future initiatives in the area of health inequalities.

This particular pilot project will increase understanding of how best to reduce specific health inequalities experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and intersex (LGBTI) people, focusing in particular on overlapping inequalities stemming from discrimination and unfair treatment on other grounds (e.g. older, younger, refugee, immigrant, disability, rural, poverty).

The project will explore the particular health needs and challenges faced by LGBTI people and analyse the key barriers faced by health professionals when providing care for LGBTI people. The aim is to raise awareness of the challenges and provide European health professionals with the tools that give them the right skills and knowledge to overcome these barriers and contribute to the reduction of health inequalities.

More information about this project on health inequalities for LGBTI people is on the ec.europa.eu website

Perinatal mental health

Perinatal mental illnesses affect at least 10% of new mothers and can have a devastating impact on them and their families. When mothers suffer from illnesses such as anxiety, depression and postnatal psychotic disorders it increases the likelihood of their children experiencing behavioural, social or learning difficulties and failing to fulfil their potential.

This project (PATH) is applying for funding from the Interreg 2Seas programme and will devise and pilot a range of services within local areas to ensure that women who are at risk of, or suffering from, perinatal mental illnesses are given appropriate support at the earliest opportunity. These services will support new mothers in their return to work and will have a clear cost benefit to them, their families and to health systems. Perinatal mental illnesses in the UK are estimated to cost society around £8.1 billion for each one-year cohort of births, with 72% of this cost relating to adverse, long-term  impacts on the child.

We have only just started looking for partners but already have interested organisations in the UK including KMPT, Plymouth MIND and the Institute of Health Visitors as well as Odisee and Karel de Grote University in Belgium.

Mental Health systems in OECD countries

Mental ill-health is widespread and its impact on people’s achievement in life is substantial. The large costs mental ill-health generates for people, families, workplaces and society as a whole is a major and growing concern for OECD governments in recent years.

The OECD is responding to this rising interest with a range of projects looking at (i) mental health care policies and reforms, (ii) the link between mental ill-health and work, (iii) health care quality aspects, and (iv) the impact of education, skills and mental ill-health.

For more information about OECD mental health projects, on the oecd.org website

Children and Adolescent Health and Wellbeing

Children and adolescents logo

June 2014. All the evidence shows that investing in the health and wellbeing of our children and young people brings life-long benefits – not only to the young people themselves but also to their families and wider society.

Attendees at this seminar had the opportunity to hear examples from the UK and abroad of good practice in securing the health and wellbeing of children and adolescents through actions and interventions outside the home. The programme gives brief biographies of both speakers and their presentations covered European projects that have focused on obesity, body image and the associated mental health of young people as well as a project that generated sustainable support networks.

Mental Health Analysis Profiles (MhAPs)

As part of a wider project on mental health in OECD countries, a series of descriptive profiles have been prepared for England, Sweden, Scotland, Netherlands, Finland and Italy intended to provide descriptive, easily comprehensible, highly informative accounts of the mental health systems.

These profiles, entitled ‘Mental Health Analysis Profiles’ (MHAPs), will be able to inform discussion and reflection and provide an introduction to and a synthesised account of mental health in a given country. Each MHAP follows the same template, and whilst the MHAPs are stand-alone profiles, loose cross-country comparison using the MHAPs is possible and encouraged.

To download the MHAP for England, click here on http://dx.doi.org

To download previous MHAPs, click here on www.oecd.org

Mental Ill-health at work

30% to 40% of all sickness and disability case-loads in OECD countries are related to mental health problems, according to this new OECD report. “Fit Mind, Fit Job: From Evidence to Practice in Mental Health and Work” has estimated that the total cost of mental illness in Europe is around 3.5% of GDP, and argues that health and employment services should intervene earlier to help people with mental health issues.

For more information, click here on www.oecd.org

Psychosocial factors linked to chronic diseases

This report summarizes the best available evidence for a link between psychosocial factors and morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular diseases and cancer in Europe. The psychosocial factors repeatedly identified as related to chronic diseases include high job demand, low autonomy, low control or high effort-reward   imbalance, interpersonal conflicts and low social support or low trust. Psychosocial factors might therefore become part of complex total risk-reducing interventions focusing on multiple risk factors.

To download the report, click here on www.euro.who.int

Dementia: Self Sustaining Communities

May 2014. Our annual conference showcased award winning innovative initiatives and projects from across Europe and the UK, aimed to better support people with dementia living in the community or care home environment.  

The programme includes speakers’ details, and the presentations below are listed in the order they appear on the programme: