Good practices in mental health and wellbeing

Mental disorders place a tremendous burden on the well-being and health of European citizens. They are a leading contributor to the burden of disease in the European Union, and approximately 38.2% of EU citizens across all age groups are affected by a mental disorder each year.
Sharing information on good practices implemented in various settings can help stimulate investment in mental health, and collaborating efforts across EU in designing and implementing such activities in a more effective and
efficient manner.
To download this report on Good practices in mental health and wellbeing from the ec.europa.eu website

 

Depression

The WHO have updated their factsheet on depression which includes the following facts:

  • Depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide, with more than 300 million sufferers of all ages, and it is a major contributor to the overall global burden of disease.
  • At its worst depression can lead to suicide, and nearly 800,000 people commit suicide every year. It is the second leading cause of death in 15-29-year-olds.
  • There are effective treatments for depression although fewer than half of sufferers receive any treatment at all.

For more information and to download the factsheet on depression on the who.int website

Depression – Let’s talk

World Health Day is celebrated on 7 April every year to mark the anniversary of the founding of the World Health Organization and it provides a unique opportunity to mobilize action around a specific health topic of concern to people all over the world.

The theme of the 2017 World Health Day campaign is depression, which can affect people of all ages, from all walks of life, in all countries. At worst, it can lead to suicide, now the second leading cause of death among 15-29-year olds. The campaign is paying particular attention to three groups that are disproportionately affected:

  • adolescents and young adults
  • women of childbearing age (particularly following childbirth)
  • adults over 60

Materials targeting these audiences are available in the campaign materials.

For more information about the campaign – Depression, let’s talk – on the who.int website

Tackling Childhood Obesity

Tackling Childhood Obesity in Europe through Awareness and Prevention 

Thursday 12th October 2017 at the Thon Hotel, Brussels

Around one-third of 11-years-olds in Europe are overweight or obese according to the WHO. More than 60% of overweight children will stay overweight into adulthood, imposing a major burden on public spending. Indeed, around 7% of the national health budgets across the EU are spent each year on diseases linked to obesity.

This symposium will enable attendees to examine the factors underpinning childhood obesity and discuss the current strategies for prevention and treatment. The symposium will further offer delegates a platform to share ideas and best practice from across Europe.

For more information and to register for Tackling Childhood Obesity on the publicpolicyexchange.co.uk website

Breast cancer care and psychological support

Psycho-oncological support has become increasingly recognised and used as part of breast cancer care services in recent years. According to a recent review of EU and EFTA member states’ national/regional cancer plans and certification schemes, the need for psycho-oncological services is widely recognised. However the concrete allocation of resources and personnel to provide these services has not been specifically addressed in most of them.

Scientists reviewed 25 national and 4 regional cancer plans/strategies among 32 researched countries. They found that while 28 recognise the need for organised psycho-oncological support only 10 have actually identified the criteria for good psychosocial care, including the resources required or educational needs.

Read more about Breast cancer care and psychological support on the ec.europa.eu website

Health inequalities for LGBTI people

The European Parliament funds a number of pilot projects – projects which are experimental and designed to test the feasibility and usefulness of action. They are intended to develop evidence-based strategies to address a problem, identify good practices, and provide policy guidance for the benefit of possible future initiatives in the area of health inequalities.

This particular pilot project will increase understanding of how best to reduce specific health inequalities experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and intersex (LGBTI) people, focusing in particular on overlapping inequalities stemming from discrimination and unfair treatment on other grounds (e.g. older, younger, refugee, immigrant, disability, rural, poverty).

The project will explore the particular health needs and challenges faced by LGBTI people and analyse the key barriers faced by health professionals when providing care for LGBTI people. The aim is to raise awareness of the challenges and provide European health professionals with the tools that give them the right skills and knowledge to overcome these barriers and contribute to the reduction of health inequalities.

More information about this project on health inequalities for LGBTI people is on the ec.europa.eu website

Mental Health systems in OECD countries

Mental ill-health is widespread and its impact on people’s achievement in life is substantial. The large costs mental ill-health generates for people, families, workplaces and society as a whole is a major and growing concern for OECD governments in recent years.

The OECD is responding to this rising interest with a range of projects looking at (i) mental health care policies and reforms, (ii) the link between mental ill-health and work, (iii) health care quality aspects, and (iv) the impact of education, skills and mental ill-health.

For more information about OECD mental health projects, on the oecd.org website

Children and Adolescent Health and Wellbeing

Children and adolescents logo

June 2014. All the evidence shows that investing in the health and wellbeing of our children and young people brings life-long benefits – not only to the young people themselves but also to their families and wider society.

Attendees at this seminar had the opportunity to hear examples from the UK and abroad of good practice in securing the health and wellbeing of children and adolescents through actions and interventions outside the home. The programme gives brief biographies of both speakers and their presentations covered European projects that have focused on obesity, body image and the associated mental health of young people as well as a project that generated sustainable support networks.

Mental Health Analysis Profiles (MhAPs)

As part of a wider project on mental health in OECD countries, a series of descriptive profiles have been prepared for England, Sweden, Scotland, Netherlands, Finland and Italy intended to provide descriptive, easily comprehensible, highly informative accounts of the mental health systems.

These profiles, entitled ‘Mental Health Analysis Profiles’ (MHAPs), will be able to inform discussion and reflection and provide an introduction to and a synthesised account of mental health in a given country. Each MHAP follows the same template, and whilst the MHAPs are stand-alone profiles, loose cross-country comparison using the MHAPs is possible and encouraged.

To download the MHAP for England, click here on http://dx.doi.org

To download previous MHAPs, click here on www.oecd.org

Mental Ill-health at work

30% to 40% of all sickness and disability case-loads in OECD countries are related to mental health problems, according to this new OECD report. “Fit Mind, Fit Job: From Evidence to Practice in Mental Health and Work” has estimated that the total cost of mental illness in Europe is around 3.5% of GDP, and argues that health and employment services should intervene earlier to help people with mental health issues.

For more information, click here on www.oecd.org